International Energy Conservation Code

According to the ICC, "Internationally, code officials recognize the need for a modern, up-to-date energy conservation code addressing the design of energy-efficient building envelopes and installation of energy-efficient mechanical, lighting and power systems through requirements emphasizing performance. The International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) is designed to meet these needs through model code regulations that will result in the optimal utilization of fossil fuel and non-depletable resources in all communities, large and small."

"IECC contains separate provisions for commercial buildings and for low-rise residential buildings (three stories or less in height above grade). Each set of provisions, IECC—Commercial Provisions and IECC—Residential Provisions, is separately applied to buildings within their respective scopes. Each set of provisions is to be treated separately. Each contains a Scope and Administration chapter, a Definitions chapter, a General Requirements chapter, a chapter containing energy efficiency requirements and existing building provisions applicable to buildings within its scope."

IECC Climate Zone Map

All of Alaska is in Zone 7 except for the following boroughs in Zone 8: Bethel, Northwest Artic, Dellinham, Southeast Fairbanks N. Star, Wade Hampton, Nome, Yukon-Koyukuk, North Slope. Zone 1 includes Hawaii, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

All of Alaska is in Zone 7 except for the following boroughs in Zone 8:
Bethel, Northwest Artic, Dellinham, Southeast Fairbanks N. Star, Wade Hampton, Nome, Yukon-Koyukuk, North Slope.

Zone 1 includes Hawaii, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

Benefits of the IECC

  • The 2015 IECC has evolved to include a new option for residential compliance, the Energy Rating Index (ERI) path in Section R406, that is supported by home builders and energy efficiency advocates.
  • The 2015 IECC increases energy efficiency, with more flexibility and easier enforcement and compliance for both builders and code officials.
  • The 2015 IECC allows, in the ERI path, the use of HERS ratings already used by builders of one third of all new homes to rate their new homes, and to market those new homes to consumers.
  • The IECC is fully coordinated with the family of I-Codes to ensure that efficiency measures are selected and installed in a manner that does not compromise safety.
  • Provisions of the IECC encourage the use of new and smarter technological advances.
  • The IECC references nationally developed consensus standards.

Status of Energy Code Adoption

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, "Model building energy codes and standards have the potential to save U.S. consumers an estimates $330 billion by 2040. This equates to nearly 80 quads of cumulative full-fuel-cycle energy savings and over 6.2 billion metric tons of avoided carbon dioxide emissions."

Commercial

Building Energy Codes Map - Commercial

Residential

Building Energy Codes Map - Residential
 

The above content was provided by the International Code Council (ICC) and the U.S. Department of Energy.

www.iccsafe.org

www.energycodes.gov